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Web Clips for June 2005

May 11, 2005
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Looking for web clips from a different issue of Electronic Musician magazine? You can find an archive of web clips from previous issues of EM magazine here.


DOWNLOAD OF THE MONTH
TIMETOYPRO 2.0
Web Clip 1:
A short flute and percussion loop is played first without time-stretching and then with time-stretching (as shown in the figure accompanying the article).

ALESIS
Micron

Web Clip 1:
In this clip, a mono bass Program is played. In the first section, I sweep the m1 slider, which is assigned to filter frequency. In the second section, I sweep the m2 slider, which is assigned to vibrato. I sweep both sliders in the third section.

Web Clip 2:
In this clip, I play a few single keys across the board of a lead Program where the filter resonance is controlled dynamically by key Velocity. With each key, you can hear both volume and resonance increase then decrease in a crescendo-like fashion.

Web Clip 3:
Here, I chose three unprocessed Programs from the Leads category. I played them in short monophonic runs, in three different octave ranges, to demonstrate Micron's convincing analog-like properties in select presets.

Web Clip 4:
This clip showcases all 118 of the Micron's individual drum sounds. They are all manually played from the keyboard in succession, in conjunction with the octave up/down buttons. This shows how the sounds that are much more reminiscent of old drum machines than sampled drum kits.

Web Clip 5:
This clip shows off Micron's impressive array of Patterns. Here I play a few bars of 10 randomly selected Patterns using a single key press for each one.

Web Clip 6:
Similar to Web Clip 5, this showcases seven of Micron's very different Rhythms. Again, each one is played with a single key press and held for a few bars. All drum sounds in the Rhythms are culled from the Micron's 118 drum sounds.

Web Clip 7:
This clip is a small example of the possibilities available in the Micron's Setups. First, a drum sequence is triggered with the press any key in a certain area of the keyboard. In the fifth measure, a bass line is triggered by the press of a key within another split. In the beginning of measure 9. a short solo enters, played manually from within yet another split. Along the way, I use sliders m1 and m2 to sweep resonance and vibrato. Notice that the underlying drums are not affected by the pot sweeps.

Web Clip 8:
This clip shows some typical effects of sweeps with knobs X, Y, and Z on two different Programs. In both instances, the knobs are individually swept to their maximum editable values and back.

IMAGE-LINE
FL Studio 5 XXL
(Win)
Web Clip 1:
This clip uses FL's Wave Traveller to transform a vocal phrase in a way that sounds a lot like scratching. The cornball phrase ("Have a cup of coffee -- it's already been saucered and blowed") is from the sample library that ships with FL Studio. It's heard in its original form near the end of the file. The background drum pattern is also played by FL Studio.

Web Clip 2:
This clip contains three different phrases spoken by the FL Speech Synthesizer. I typed all three phrases ("I've got happy feet," "To be or not to be, that is the question," and "Your moldy lunch is freaking me out") myself, and the Speech Synthesizer rendered them. Some of FL Studio's bundled effects are used to enhance the phrases. The stuttering is created not with Wave Traveller but by repeating certain notes in the Piano Roll editor.

The Lost World Rediscovered (Win)
Web Clip 1   Web Clip 2   Web Clip 3:
The virtual MS-20 emulates the oscillator drift of the real deal when you crank up the Analog control.

Web Clip 4:
The Arturia MiniMoog V is followed by the vintage MiniMoog.

Web Clip 5:
One of the most challenging comparisons of the bunch, the Moog is heard first. Yes, the last note is both played together.

Web Clip 6:
The keyboard of the Moog was awkward to play, hinting at its identity. The real Moog is heard first.

Web Clip 7:
Here's a nice, fat bass patch, first heard on the vintage instrument.

Web Clip 8:
The virtual, the vintage, the Voyager, are heard in that order.

Web Clip 9  Web Clip 10:
Muon's Tau Bassline Mk2 is a dead ringer for the Roland TB-303. The 303 is first in both clips.

Web Clip 11   Web Clip 12   Web Clip 13   Web Clip 14   Web Clip 15:
The Korg Polysix matches up pretty well with its Legacy Collection offspring. The hardware version is heard first only in Web Clip 12.

Web Clip 16   Web Clip 17   Web Clip 18   Web Clip 19   Web Clip 20:
Arturia's CS-80V was hard to match perfectly, but it's cut from the same cloth as the original Yamaha. The Yamaha is heard first in 16, 18, and 20.

Web Clip 21   Web Clip 22   Web Clip 23   Web Clip 24   Web Clip 25   Web Clip 26:
Pitting a digital synthesizer against a virtual synthesizer presented a more level playing field, to say the least. The Legacy Collection Wavestation is presented first in 21, 22, and 23.

PROPELLERHEAD SOFTWARE
Reason Drum Kits ReFill Collection
(Mac/Win)
Web Clip 1:
This loop is taken from both a preset NN-XT patch as well as one of the supplied songs. It highlights the hard rock/thrash drums.

Web Clip 2:
This loop is taken from both a preset NN-XT patch as well as one of the supplied songs. It highlights the funk/soul drums. This example has a jazzy hip-hop edge and beautifully demonstrates the multiple Velocity layering with the snare hits.

Web Clip 3:
This loop is taken from both a preset NN-XT patch as well as one of the supplied songs. It highlights the funk/jazzy drums and uses reverb from a preset on the RV7000.

Web Clip 4:
This loop is taken from both a preset NN-XT patch as well as one of the supplied songs. It highlights the funk rock drums and is one of my favorites. It really demonstrates the “big sound” possibilities of NN-XT with Drum Kits. Reverb was removed from the drums.

Web Clip 5:
This clip shows off Micron's impressive array of Patterns. Here I play a few bars of 10 randomly selected Patterns using a single key press for each one.

Web Clip 6:
This funk/rock loop was written by the author using one of the “Eddie” preset ReDrum kits.

Web Clip 7:
The same funk/rock loop as in Web Clip 6, alternating with another of the “Eddie” preset ReDrum kits.

Web Clip 8:
The same funk/rock loop as in Web Clip 6, alternating with the “FreshA” preset ReDrum kit.

Web Clip 9:
The same funk/rock loop as in Web Clip 6, alternating with the “HotCLS” preset ReDrum kit. This example has a really tight ringing snare and nicely showcases the realism of the samples.

Web Clip 10:
The same funk/rock loop as in Web Clip 6, alternating with the “HotAM” preset ReDrum kit. This example is much more aggressive and showcases the Drum Kits' wide range of sounds.

Web Clip 11:
A jazz loop written by the author using one of the preset NN-XT patches. A great example of a typical jazz kit, complete with snare rolls, large rides, and small splashes.

Web Clip 12:
The same jazz loop as in Web Clip 11, substituting a Rock NN-XT patch. This example has a much darker feel, much heavier kick and snare, and showcases the variety of different drum kits available.

SOUND DESIGN WORKSHOP
Creating Guitar Effects with Software Instruments

Web Clip 1:
A guitar phrase is repeated six times: unprocessed, with slap-back echo, with manually controlled lowpass filtering, with LFO-triggered filter and amplifier envelopes, with LFO filter-cutoff modulation, and with OscB filter-cutoff modulation.

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