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Web Clips for February 2008

January 12, 2008
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p26 | Download of the Month: Puremagnetik Big07 (Mac/Win)

Web Clip 1: Hear an audio example of the Micropaks in Big07, which make a versatile construction kit when used together.

p42 | Master Class: Scripting in Kontakt 3

Web Clip 1: This ZIP archive contains all scripts covered in the Masterclass.

Web Clip 2: The C Major scale is played with automatically generated triads. The upward pass is not pitch-corrected, whereas the downward pass is, causing the chord tones stay within the scale.

p48 | Metalocalypse Now

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Web Clip 1: EM editor Gino Robair visits Brendon Small in the private pro studio enclave at Titmouse Inc. for the production of "Metalocalypse," Adult Swim's hit animation series.

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Web Clip 2: "Metalocalypse" composer/co-creator Brendon Small walks us through his gear, where he makes huge metal sounds in a tiny apartment.

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Web Clip 3: One of "Metalocalypse" composer/co-creator Brendon Small's fave new toys is Gibson's HD.6X-Pro Guitar System, which takes shredding and screaming leads to a whole new level.

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Web Clip 4: "Metalocalypse" composer/co-creator Brendon Small's key axe of choice is a Gibson Explorer guitar—customized with EMG pickups and a special metal touch you can't find in stores.

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Web Clip 5: With just about every guitar gadget at his disposal, "Metalocalypse" composer/co-creator Brendon Small finally reveals the one piece of recording studio gear that he just can't do without—don't miss the startling conclusion!

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Web Clip 6: "Metalocalypse" co-creator Tommy Blacha talks about how it all began and explains what life in the metal lane is all about.

p58 | Crossing the Finish Line

Web Clip 1: Although the kick drum and electric guitar in this audio clip sound roughly equal in volume, a glance at your peak-reading meters will reveal the kick drum takes up more headroom.

Web Clip 2: This video shows the large meter swings produced on peaks in a punchy mix having a large crest factor.

Web Clip 3: This video shows how peak meters react to a fatiguing mix with a small crest factor. The meters rarely fluctuate from a full scale reading.

p72 | Sound Design Workshop: Um''s the Word

Web Clip 1: When people punctuate their speech with ums, it often produces an interesting rhythm. Here you''ll hear a brief recording of interviewer Charlie Rose interrupting a stammering Henry Kisinger, followed by the same recording layered with a drum loop.

Web Clip 2: Here''s the Kissinger loop in a musical context, played live in a jam session with guitar, flute, drums, bass, and a second keyboardist. The band, led by synthesizer expert Mark Vail, is called Within Shouting Distance of Reality.

Web Clip 3: Former EM Assistant Editor Matt Gallagher left me an unintentionally rhythmic voice-mail message, which inspired this tune. I padded out the voice with a synchronized delay so it would last a whole bar.

Web Clip 4: Here''s another stuttering sample, snipped from a recent interview in my Digital Media Insider podcast (digitalmedia.oreilly.com/podcast-audio). First you''ll hear the original recording, then a version punched up with BIAS Peak''s Normalize RMS function set to –10 dB. Note the extra “the” syllable, which throws off the rhythm.

Web Clip 5: This clip demonstrates four approaches to quantizing the speech rhythm; each example lasts two bars. The drum loop is from BT''s Breakz from the Nu Skool sampling CD, published by EastWest.

First, you''ll hear Web Clip 4 with Ableton Live warp markers positioned to skip quickly over the extra “the.” Second, two warp markers are set so close they produce an interesting buzz. Third, I deleted the spurious “the” in Peak and then moved Live''s warp markers for the smoothest sound of all. Finally, you''ll hear the clip sliced, pitched, and panned in Izotope Phatmatik Pro.

Web Clip 6: Listen closely and you''ll hear three um samples in this clip. The initial Lily Pad sample first appears raw, then quantized and looped. Web Clip 4 returns, this time played through Live''s Beat Repeat effect for variety. And Henry Kissinger takes a mumbling cameo as well. The bass and lead are from the UVI Korg Edition plug-in synth; the pad is a Live 6 synth.

p74 | Square One: Read the Script

Web Clip 1: FinaleScript Example


batch process folder
resize pages to 75%
check ties
execute menu item uncheck “Document/Display in Concert Pitch”
execute menu item “Utilities/Note Spacing/Apply Note Spacing to Current Part/Score”

Web Clip 1: Kontakt Script Example


on init
declare ui_menu $interval
add_menu_item ($interval, “fifth”, 7)
add_menu_item ($interval, “octave”, 12)
end on

on release
play_note($EVENT_NOTE+$interval, $EVENT_VELOCITY, 0, 100000)
end on

p84 | Mackie Tracktion 3.03

Web Clip 1: A video showing some of the key functions of Tracktion 3's all-purpose Edit Screen.

p88 | Roland VG-99

Web Clip 1:: Here''s a bit of noodling on the VG-99 with a 12-string guitar patch tuned DADGAD. A virtual amp with a virtual mic adds a bit of warm crunch to the sound.

Web Clip 2: A similar performance with the same patch substitutes two synth models for the acoustic guitar models. Strummed 12-string DADGAD synthesizers, anyone?

Web Clip 3: Here''s a short bunch of folk-guitar strums, harmonics, and blues licks on the VG-99''s model of a Martin D-28.

Web Clip 4: A bit of slop in the left-hand performance of this fingerpicked virtual Gibson J-45 model yields some string buzz and a bit of a typical piezoelectric quack. Overall, this model sounds a bit more realistic than the Martin model; both are more than serviceable, but neither would fool an experienced acoustic guitar maven.

Web Clip 5: Here is an example of a VG-99''s GR-300 synth model in all its nasty glory.

Web Clip 6: In this clip, I have tamed a factory patch''s filter cutoff for a smoother sound.

p102 | Fender VG Stratocaster

Web Clip 1: The Fender VG Stratocaster is played successively in Normal mode with Normal tuning, Stratocaster mode with Normal tuning, and Stratocaster mode with 12-string tuning. The guitar was played through a Roland MicroCube amp (with tone controls flat), miked with a Royer R-121 mic routed through the preamp section of an SSL Alpha Channel.

Web Clip 2: The Fender VG Stratocaster is played successively in Normal, Stratocaster, Telecaster, and Humbucking Pickups modes through a Roland MicroCube amp. Again, the amp was miked with a Royer R-121 routed through an SSL Alpha Channel.

Web Clip 3: The Fender VG Stratocaster''s five modeled acoustic guitars are played here in turn, each in Normal tuning mode and with their built-in reverb fully cranked. The VG Stratocaster was patched directly to an SSL Alpha Channel set to its cleanest settings.

Web Clip 4: An open B string is played in D Modal tuning mode to produce an A natural, using Stratocaster and Humbucking Pickups modes in turn. Note that the undesirable bleed of the B string''s unprocessed pitch is slightly more audible in Stratocaster mode.

Web Clip 5: The modeled Stratocaster is played in Open G tuning mode, with unvoiced strings first manually muted and then left free to subtly resonate. A ghost note a whole-step lower bleeds through when the unpicked strings are not muted.

p116 | Kurzweil SP2X Stage Piano

All files were recorded from the SP2X's audio outs directly into Pro Tools.

Web Clip 1: This example uses the Grand piano: patch 01 Stereo Grand patch.

Web Clip 2: This example uses the Dual Wah Clav patch.

Web Clip 3: This example uses the Big Red Wurly patch.

Web Clip 4: This example uses the Film String patch.

p124 | Vital Arts Plectrum

Web Clip 1: A single note and then a single chord played repeatedly on this harmonics patch uses Velocity switching to crossfade between sounds with different pitches and overtones.

Web Clip 2: Plectrum''s Jar Attack Piano uses glass to excite piano strings. Notice that stronger Velocities call up a sample with a slower attack.

p130 | Ueberschall Liquid Drums 1.5.1

Web Clip 1: This example strings together a batch of funk grooves. At some point, you may notice a few tweaks to pitches and durations; Liquid Instruments lets you select elements of a sliced groove for editing.

p132 | Eventide TimeFactor

Web Clip 1: Multitap delay yields a complex richness that surprises and delights.

Web Clip 2: In Band Delay mode, I stretched the limits of the parameters, finding smoothness all the way to the edges and uncovering no seams.

Web Clip 3: Reverse Delay mode provides unexpected results and shows off the unit's power and versatility.

p132 | DigiTech Vocalist Live 2

Web Clip 1: This is a short example of how the Vocalist Live 2 can harmonize with your voice by analyzing your guitar chords. I''m feeding my Koll Tornado, with no effects, in to the guitar input. I have a slight amount of Hall reverb on my vocal with the Enhance effect adding some high-end sheen. I''m using both harmony lines, one set to a third below my pitch and the other to unison.

p134 | Scarbee Black Bass

Web Clip 1: The Scarbee Black Bass offers a solid fingered bass sound that is rich in harmonic character and suitable for virtually any style of music. This example shows it off in a Latin-tinged jazz context.

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