Search Gear
 

Korg Announces New Products at Musikmesse

April 10, 2013
share
Korg announces the new KROSS keyboard. Kross is a mobile, affordable, keyboard workstation with audio/MIDI recording capabilities, AC or battery operation (6xAA), and a vast selection of cutting-edge sounds. Available with 61 keys or 88 fully-weighted keys, it's the first battery-powered, full-featured Korg keyboard workstation. With rich sounds that are top of its class, and practical features such as analog-style step sequencing and built-in audio recorder, all in a lightweight and portable package, Kross offers keyboardists of all levels a musical instrument with specs and style that will exceed people's expectation of a keyboard at this price point.

A complete package of performance-ready sounds is provided. The piano, electric piano, and drum sounds have been taken from some of Korg's flagship instruments, offering a set of sounds that surpasses other instruments in its class. The grand piano features intricately-sampled decays with three levels of velocity, and also reproduces the noises made by the damper pedal, ensuring that every nuance is reflected in the sound. The distinctive sounds from Korg's famed SG-1D Sampling Grand and M1 Music Workstation are also included, as well as an upright piano--a rarity amongst PCM keyboards. The five classic electric piano sounds are as expressive as the acoustic piano sounds, and also include effect settings. In addition, careful attention has been paid to the drum sounds, which are indispensable for song writing and creation with the keyboard.

Kross contains PCM data approximately twice as large as preceding Korg models such as the X50 and the PS60. Essential sounds like rock/jazz organ, strings, brass, and synth sounds have all been upgraded and enhanced. Also included are instruments such as toy piano, accordion, combo organ, church organ, and even vintage instruments such as a tape sampler. And unique to a keyboard of its class are unique sounds that excel in today's EDM dance music and electronica.

The high-quality EDS-i sound engine is distilled from the EDS/EDS-X sound engines found on Korg's most advanced instruments. It allows a total of seven effects (five insert; two master) to be used simultaneously. Effect types include delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, and rotary speaker, as well as amp modeling powered by Korg's proprietary "REMS" modeling technology, and even a vocoder. In total, 134 high-quality effects are available.

Kross includes a full-featured, 16-track MIDI sequencer with quantization, copy and paste, and individual note event editing, as well as an analog-style step sequencer inherited from Korg's Electribe series, for quick production capability. The easy-to-use sequencer design features sixteen buttons that are used to turn individual notes on or off, allowing the user to quickly and easily create original rhythm patterns of up to 64 steps. SMF-format data can easily be exchanged with a computer via an optional SC card. A full set of workstation and production tools include a stereo audio recorder with overdubbing capabilities, a one-touch Drum Track function, and an arpeggiator to animate any type of sound.

The Kross' unmistakable color and design project a powerful presence on stage or anywhere else. The top panel is a sleek black color, while the rear and side panels feature a bold red color scheme. The 61-key model, with its distinctive carrying handle, is amazingly light; at only 4.3 kg/9.5 lb, it's the most portable in its category. The 88-key model packs a piano-touch hammer action keyboard into a mere 12.4 kg/27.3 lbs. Both models can operate on an AC adapter or on six AA alkaline or nickel-metal hydride batteries.

The Korg Kross keyboard workstation will be available in August 2013 with U.S. Street prices as follows: 61-key: $699 and 88-key: $999.

Additional product information is available at Korg.com

 
Korg USA has announced the Volca series of portable, true-analog synthesizers. Following in the footsteps of the Korg Monotron, Monotribe, and the MS-20 Mini synth, these next-generation true-analog instruments offer on-the-go sounds and grooves along with MIDI functionality. The series is comprised of three models: the Volca Keys lead synthesizer; the Volca Bass synthesizer; and the Volca Beats rhythm machine.

All models provide carefully selected parameters that allow users to create the distinctive, massive sounds that can only come from a true analog synthesizer. Each instrument features a loop sequencer for intuitively generating and recalling phrase-based performances. Multiple Volcas can be used in tandem thanks to vintage-style sync in/out, or with the user's DAW software via MIDI In. Convenient, optional battery operation and built-in speakers provide the ability to play anywhere at any time.

The Volca Keys represents a new chapter in Korg's long history of analog synthesizers. This 27-key analog lead synth generates sound that's more powerful than its compact, low-profile body would suggest. Its three oscillators can be tuned against each other in a variety of ways-from one part unison to three-part chords-to provide the versatility needed to create a diversity of sounds. With a filter section that utilizes the circuitry of the classic miniKORG700S (1974) plus an easy-to-use interface that includes delay effects and a 16-step sequencer, Volca Keys offers the richly expressive sounds that are distinctive of an analog synth, and combines the enjoyment of basic sound creation with deep functionality.

The Volca Bass is an analog bass line groove box that's capable of generating a wide range of bass lines. Though basic in structure, the analog sound engine has an unmistakable presence with subtle nuances that cannot be reproduced by a digital simulation, making it ideally-suited for acid house and many other styles of electronic music. Its step sequencer-distilled from Korg's Electribe series-offers a convenient, visually intuitive way to generate "free form" bass loops to stimulate inspiration. The three oscillators can be combined in several ways via a voicing function, to generate a variety of thick and modulated bass sounds.

The Volca Beats offers six fat analog drum sounds: Kick, Snare, Hi Tom, Lo Tom, Closed Hi Hat, and Open Hi Hat. It contains a wide array of sound variations that could not be produced by any means other than analog, with special emphasis on the sounds that are considered indispensable for dance music. A PCM sound engine is also included for generating clap, crash and others sounds that are better suited for PCM. Simple knob-based parameters can be used to quickly create a variety of drum sounds. For example, simply by using the three knobs (Click, Pitch, and Decay), a variety of kick sounds can be crafted, ranging from rough sounds that dominate the low range to tight sounds that keep a precise beat. In addition, a 16-part sequencer is included to easily add or remove parts.

The Volca series will be available in July 2013 for a U.S. street price of $149.99 each. Additional product information is available at Korg.com
 

Korg announces the LP-380 Digital Piano. Just over ten inches in depth, it's slim enough to fit anywhere. The soft-fall, wooden key cover is flat on top, allowing the instrument to blend elegantly into a room when it's not being played. The LP-380 features Korg's RH3 keyboard, three pedals, and large-diameter speakers ensure a superb piano-playing experience and a rich and robust piano sound. There are two colors to choose from: black or white.

A total of 30 expressive, high-quality sounds are built in, including piano and electric piano. Particular emphasis was placed on the electric piano sounds, which reproduce not only the way the tone responds to touch, but also the subtle noises that occur when a key is released. Six varieties are provided, covering the sounds widely used in pop music of the '60s and '70s.

In order to reproduce the playing feel of an acoustic piano as closely as possible, the sound switches between four piano samples according to the player's dynamics. From subtle touches to powerful crescendos, the sound will respond realistically to user input. Additionally, the LP-380 includes all three pedals normally found on a concert grand piano, including support for realistic half-pedaling on both the damper and soft pedals. These pedals are affixed to the LP-380 in the perfect position for a true piano playing experience.

A Layer Mode lets two sounds be played together, and a Partner Mode divides the keyboard into left and right regions so that two people can play the same range of pitches at the same time. This is useful not only for duets, but for teacher/student interaction. Two headphone jacks also make it convenient for two people to enjoy playing the LP-380 together. Nine different temperaments can be selected, some of which support historically authentic performances with period instrument ensembles.

The amplifier (22W x 2) boasts the highest output in its class, properly reproducing expressive piano sounds with authentic, detailed tone and damper resonance. Two large-diameter 3.9" speakers are mounted inside the cabinet, allowing the sound to resonate for even richer depth. The speakers have been placed below the keyboard to create the sensation of sound enveloping the entire piano, for even greater realism.

The Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 (RH3) keyboard reproduces the same playing experience as on a grand piano, with a heavier response in the lower register and a lighter response in the higher register. In addition, a Key Touch Control function lets the user choose one of three levels to specify how the performance dynamics will affect the sound.

The Korg LP-380 will be available in late June 2013 for a US Street price of $1199. Additional product information is available at Korg.com
 
 
 
Show Comments

These are my comments.

Featured

Reader Poll

Do you spend more time producing or playing?


See results without voting »